TC.661913 – ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI – Opera omnia for keyboard, vol. III – organ: Francesco Tasini

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TC.661913

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ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI (1660-1725)
Complete Keyboard Works - Vol. III

Palermo, 2 May 1660 – d. Naples, 22 October 1725), is a further step in the recording of the “Opera Omnia per stromento a tastiera” of this great composer from Palermo. The publication of the enormous body of manuscripts containing his music for the keyboard, which we embarked on about ten years ago is, of course, the result of considerable study and planning; in fact work on the series “Opera Omnia per strumento a tastiera” published by Ut Orpheus Edizioni, Bologna, started in 2000 and the fifth volume was published recently. In the same way as for the second CD in theseries (Tactus 661912), the reference volumes and pages for the pieces recorded here, which are already available in the five volumes of the Opera Omnia, are indicated using the acronym ASOT (Alessandro Scarlatti Opera per Tastiera in the list of pieces), followed by the volume and page numbers. The organ chosen to record this CD was built in 1854 by Antonio Sangalli (1820-1901) for S. Paolo Apostolo Parish Church in Ziano Piacentino (Piacenza, Italy), and restored in 2004 by Daniele Giani. Even though it is a19th century instrument, the organ has a variety of tone colours, which are sweet and soft in the Principale and the Voce Umana and crystalline and compact in the Ripieno.

The reeds [Fagotto reale ne’ bassi and Trombe soprani] are prompt and uniform within the tessitura and the Flauti ‘spiccati’ (marked), all in total concordance with the 18th century organ tradition and the perfect sound setting of the Sangalli organ.

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Cod.: TC.661913
Composer: ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI (1660-1725)
Performers: Francesco Tasini, organ
Edition: March 2010
Note: Organ made in 1854 by Antonio Sangalli (1820-1901), and restored by "Casa d'Organi Giani" in 2004